AEOSP Fables

The Lion and the Mouse

The Mouse and the Lion



The Lion and the Mouse




A LION was awakened from sleep by a Mouse running over his face. Rising up angrily, he caught him and was about to kill him, when the Mouse begged for his life, saying:
"If you would only spare me, I would be sure to repay your kindness."

The Lion laughed and let him go. It happened shortly after this that the Lion was caught in a hunter's net, and could not free himself. The Mouse, recognizing his roar, came and gnawed the rope with his teeth, and set him free. He said:

"You ridiculed the idea of my ever being able to help you, never expecting to receive from me any repayment of your favor; now you know that it is possible for even a Mouse to help a Lion."





What MORAL did you get from this FABLE?










Mouse Lion Moral

The Mouse and the Lion Moral




 


There are times when even the weak can help the strong.







The Tortoise and the Hare



The Tortoise and the Hare



A HARE one day ridiculed the short feet and slow pace of the Tortoise, who replied, laughing:

"Though you be swift as the wind, I will beat you in a race."

The Hare, believing her claim to be simply impossible, accepted the challenge; and they agreed that the Fox should choose the course and fix the goal.


On the day appointed for the race the two started together. The Tortoise never for a moment stopped, but went on with a slow but steady pace straight to the end of the course. The Hare, lying down by the wayside, fell fast asleep.


At last waking up, and moving as fast as he could, he saw the Tortoise had reached the goal, and was comfortably dozing after her fatigue.





What MORAL did you get from this FABLE?










Tortoise Hare Moral

The Tortoise and the Hare Moral




 


Slow but steady wins the race.







Thoth and the Woodcutter

Thoth and the Woodcutter



Thoth and the Woodcutter




A WOODCUTTER was cutting wood on a riverside when he lost his axe in the water. With no one there to help him, he sat down on the river back and began to cry.


Thoth (an ancient Egyptian god) felt sorry for him and dove into the water and brought up a golden axe. He asked the Woodcutter if this was his axe, and the Woodcutter said "No."


He dove in again and brought up a silver axe and asked the woodcutter if this one was his. And again the Woodcutter said "No."


When he went down a third time and brought up the Woodcutter's axe, the Woodcutter said, "That is the right one."


Thoth was so pleased with his honesty that he gave him the other two axes as well.



The Woodcutter told one of his friends what happened. Who then hurried to the river, and after throwing his axe into the water, sat down and cried.


Again Thoth felt sorry for him and dove down and brought up a golden axe. When he asked if this was axe his, the Woodcutter's Friend joyfully said, "Yes."


Thoth was so disgusted with the lie that left without giving him the golden axe or his own axe in the river.





What MORAL did you get from this FABLE?











Thoth and the Woodcutter Moral

Thoth and the Woodcutter Moral




 


Honesty is the best policy.